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Planned Giving

Bequest

Bequest

Simple Bequest Story – Jack Beebe ’60:
In 2016, St. John’s School received a $75,000 gift to the Headmaster’s Student Assistance Fund from the estate of John “Jack” Beebe ’60. Although Jack was not actively engaged with the School after he moved away to pursue an illustrious career, his experience here at St. John’s always remained close to his heart.

His brother, Roger Beebe ’59, an estate attorney himself, helped Jack in the final stages of his estate planning. By the time Roger became involved, Jack had already named St. John’s as a beneficiary. Though they never directly discussed Jack’s motivations for this gift, Roger  speculates that Jack’s reasons were simple: “because he was grateful.” According to Roger, “St. John’s helped prepare us, taught us how to study, and helped us to get into the mindset to truly learn. Without St. John’s, it is very possible that none of us Beebe children would have been accepted into the colleges we attended. St. John’s has a reputation for producing great students with enhanced capabilities and opportunities. Jack recognized this.”

As a man of many passions, Jack’s estate gifts reflected his varied interests. After making specific gifts to his family in his will, he left the bulk of his estate to a California land conservation trust, Williams College, and St. John’s. The designation of Jack’s gift to the Headmaster’s Student Assistance Fund was a perfect match for him. As his brother Roger said, “Jack loved being at St. John’s, and he would have wanted his gift to help make a difference in someone else’s life there.”
 

Simple Bequest – How it works

A bequest is the most common planned gift. in most cases, it is not complicated or cumbersome to execute, but usually requires an attorney to draft. The donor designates St. John’s School as a beneficiary in his or her will or living trust. This process can take place during an initial creation of a will or living trust, or it can be added with a codicil. Once executed, donors may choose to inform St. John’s of their action and, in some cases, may share details of their plan.

Many donors prefer to make bequests because they can retain control of their assets during their lifetime. If donors choose to inform St. John’s of their action, they automatically become members of the Chidsey Society and will be recognized as such in St. John’s publications and donor stewardship communications. However, donors can choose to remain anonymous as well, even if they inform St. John’s of their plans.

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